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Alcohol addiction and alcoholism are a reality for countless individuals in Ohio, and many communities struggle with this problem. The need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in the state has never been greater.

Alcohol rehab programs in Ohio provides a workable solution to individuals that struggle with alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Trained specialists at alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab facilities in Ohio know the difficulties involved in overcoming any addiction, and are prepared to help in any way to ensure a successful recovery. Individuals seeking alcohol treatment in Ohio can avail themselves of counseling and other tools used in rehab to assess the causes of their addiction. They can then use these new life tools and abilities gained to prevent similar situations in the future. Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Ohio offers a new outlook on life that is positive and productive.

People in Ohio who have been addicted to alcohol for a long period of time will most often experience physical withdrawal when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal symptoms can be extremely uncomfortable and even painful at times, one of the reasons individuals find it so hard to stop drinking in the first place. In some cases withdrawal can be fatal. The difficulty and danger of withdrawal is one of the reasons it is extremely important that individuals in Ohio get the help they need in an alcohol rehab to get through it successfully.

The many alcohol treatment and rehabilitation options available in Ohio include Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehab Programs, Short-term Alcohol Treatment Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

There is a solution to alcohol addiction, and it can be achieved through alcohol rehabilitation and treatment. Seek an alcohol rehab program in Ohio and begin the path to recovery today.


Ohio alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In Ohio, alcohol related deaths and traffic fatalities in general reached their highest points in 1987, with 1,007 and 1,772, respectively. The year that showed the highest percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related was 1982, with 60%. The lowest number of alcohol-related deaths occurred in 2008, with 415. Also in 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 30% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 54% in 1982.

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon an Ohio police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Ohio, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Ohio drunk driving statistics, as shown above, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value." The fatality rates shown below refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

1,607

966

60

864

54

1983

1,582

919

58

824

52

1984

1,646

957

58

844

51

1985

1,646

927

56

812

49

1986

1,673

978

58

855

51

1987

1,772

1,007

57

876

49

1988

1,748

946

54

809

46

1989

1,772

834

47

744

42

1990

1,638

745

45

652

40

1991

1,636

730

45

653

40

1992

1,439

535

37

466

32

1993

1,478

577

39

510

34

1994

1,370

455

33

394

29

1995

1,360

486

36

410

30

1996

1,391

509

37

430

31

1997

1,441

528

37

465

32

1998

1,422

531

37

467

33

1999

1,430

535

37

466

33

2000

1,366

562

41

494

36

2001

1,378

608

44

509

37

2002

1,418

558

39

491

35

2003

1,277

467

37

402

31

2004

1,286

492

38

418

32

2005

1,323

505

38

409

31

2006

1,235

451

37

377

31

2007

1.257

473

38

391

31

2008

1,190

415

35

356

30



2003-2004 Ohio Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

7.3%

[37th of 51

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

16.9%

[15th of 52

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

56.7%

[27th of 52

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

6.1%

[8th of 52

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

492

[10th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.429 per 10,000 people

[40th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

38%

[32nd of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

51.41%

[24th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Ohio?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Ohio age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Ohio, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in Ohio are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Ohio

  • A person who commits a first DWI in Ohio faces up to six months in jail and is subject to pay a fine of $250 to $1,000. The driver's license suspension period is six months to three years.
  • A person who commits a second DWI in Ohio within six years of the previous conviction faces up to six months in jail and is subject to pay a fine of $350 to $1,500. The driver's license suspension period is one to five years.
  • A person who commits a third DWI in Ohio within six years of the previous convictions faces up to one year in jail and is subject to pay a fine of $550 to $2,500. The driver's license suspension period is two to 10 years.
  • A person who commits a fourth or subsequent DWI in Ohio within six years of the previous convictions faces up to five years in prison and is subject to pay a fine of $800 to $10,000. The driver's license suspension period is three years to life.

Limited Driving Privileges/Ignition Interlock

Depending on the circumstances of the DWI in Ohio, an offender may be permitted to have limited driving privileges after serving a certain portion of the driver's license suspension period for limited purposes, such as getting to and from work, school, a medical appointment, or court-ordered treatment. In most cases, the grant of limited driving privileges requires the offender to use an ignition interlock device.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with Ohio's DWI laws, a commercial driver who is convicted of DWI while operating any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the offender was driving a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. If a commercial driver is convicted of a second DWI while operating any vehicle, the offender will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of at least 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

An underage driver who commits a first DWI in Ohio while driving with a BAC of at least .02 but less than .08 is guilty of a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. A misdemeanor of the fourth degree is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a fine of up to $250. The driver's license suspension period is three months to two years.

An underage driver who commits a second DWI in Ohio while driving with a BAC of at least .02 but less than .08 within one year of the first offense is guilty of a misdemeanor of the third degree. A misdemeanor of the third degree is punishable by up to 60 days in jail and a fine of up to $500. The driver's license suspension period is one to five years.

What is Ohio's Dram Shop Act?

Under Ohio's Dram Shop Act, a person who is injured as a result of the actions of an intoxicated person has a cause of action against the liquor permit holder or the employee of the permit holder who sold alcohol to the intoxicated person if the injury occurred on the permit holder's property or in a parking lot under the permit holder's control and if the injury was proximately caused by the negligence of the permit holder or the negligence of its employee. A person has a cause of action against the permit holder or its employee for personal injury caused by the negligent acts of an intoxicated person occurring off the premises or away from a parking lot under the permit holder's control if the permit holder or its employee knowingly sold alcohol to a noticeably intoxicated person or to a person under 21 and the person's intoxication proximately caused the injury.

Criminal Penalties for Selling or Providing Alcohol to a Person Under 21

In Ohio, it is a crime to sell or provide alcohol to a person under 21. This crime is punishable by up to six months in prison, a fine of $500 to $1,000, or both.

Penalties for Selling Alcohol to an Intoxicated Person

In Ohio, it is a minor offense for a licensed drinking establishment to sell alcohol to an intoxicated person. A violation of this law subjects the offender to a fine of $25 to $100.

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  • Adolescents are more likely than adults to take part in activities when they are too impaired to perform them competently, such as driving, and also are more likely to consume alcohol to the point of coma.
  • The UK is in the top ten in the world for alcohol consumption per head, and alcohol abuse is on the rise.
  • Over 30% of all heavy drinkers develop alcoholic hepatitis; symptoms include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever and jaundice; this condition can last for years in its mild form and eventually damage the liver.
  • The prevalence of current drinking among persons aged 21 to 25 also declined significantly from 70% in 1985 to 56% in 1991, but increased to 60% by 1999.